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Coal mines sucking up water when crises hit

Article image for Coal mines sucking up water when crises hit

Australia’s water supply is being bought by coal mining companies, leaving those in rural areas high and dry.

Tropical Cyclone Kelvin is currently circulating WA’s Kimberly region.

And there are forecasts of rain in the next for days of up to 16 inches.

This comes after an area larger than Victoria was earlier this month isolated by flooding when storms dumped 640ml of rain in five days.

Alan Jones makes it clear Australia is not short of water.

“We’re short of brains and guts and willpower and judgement to shift it from where it is to where it’s needed.”

He speaks with Georgina Woods, the NSW coordinator for Lock the Gate.

“Over the last 10 years, there has been a lot more water of the Hunter River system being bought by the coal mining companies.

“When drought hits, if we get to the point where water allocations are tightened, it will be the mines who get most of the high-security water.

“We can afford to let [water] be lost to mining pits in the Hunter.”

Listen to the full interview below

Alan Jones
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